OUR UNIversal talents

…magnetising

TU Dresden is my Uni because we discover and develop materials for the future. In solid-state physics, we research the fundamentals of quantum materials and provide building blocks for the advanced technologies of the next generation.

I am a professor at the Institute of Theoretical Physics and work at TU because Dresden is one of the best locations for research in my field – solid-state physics.

Here, I am holding a model of a pyrochlore lattice in my hands. It consists of tetrahedrons that are connected at their corners. This atomic lattice structure, which occurs in many magnetic materials, leads to “frustration”: the interactions of magnetic atoms are not compatible. This results in a multitude of new states of matter that are fundamentally different from those of ordinary magnets. Such materials and states are the subject of research in the DFG Collaborative Research Centre 1143 “Correlated Magnetism: from Frustration to Topology” and also constitute one of the pillars of the new Cluster of Excellence “Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter” (ct.qmat).

Our work combines physics and chemistry and takes place in close co-operation with the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, the Max Planck Institutes for the Physics of Complex Systems and for Chemical Physics of Solids as well as with the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.

TU Dresden is my Uni because we discover and develop materials for the future. In solid-state physics, we research the fundamentals of quantum materials and provide building blocks for the advanced technologies of the next generation.

I am a professor at the Institute of Theoretical Physics and work at TU because Dresden is one of the best locations for research in my field – solid-state physics.

Here, I am holding a model of a pyrochlore lattice in my hands. It consists of tetrahedrons that are connected at their corners. This atomic lattice structure, which occurs in many magnetic materials, leads to “frustration”: the interactions of magnetic atoms are not compatible. This results in a multitude of new states of matter that are fundamentally different from those of ordinary magnets. Such materials and states are the subject of research in the DFG Collaborative Research Centre 1143 “Correlated Magnetism: from Frustration to Topology” and also constitute one of the pillars of the new Cluster of Excellence “Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter” (ct.qmat).

Our work combines physics and chemistry and takes place in close co-operation with the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, the Max Planck Institutes for the Physics of Complex Systems and for Chemical Physics of Solids as well as with the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.

Prof.
Matthias
Vojta
Professor of Theoretical Solid-State Physics and Chairman of the ct.qmat Cluster of Excellence
share
mehr lesen

TU Dresden is my Uni because we discover and develop materials for the future. In solid-state physics, we research the fundamentals of quantum materials and provide building blocks for the advanced technologies of the next generation.

I am a professor at the Institute of Theoretical Physics and work at TU because Dresden is one of the best locations for research in my field – solid-state physics.

Here, I am holding a model of a pyrochlore lattice in my hands. It consists of tetrahedrons that are connected at their corners. This atomic lattice structure, which occurs in many magnetic materials, leads to “frustration”: the interactions of magnetic atoms are not compatible. This results in a multitude of new states of matter that are fundamentally different from those of ordinary magnets. Such materials and states are the subject of research in the DFG Collaborative Research Centre 1143 “Correlated Magnetism: from Frustration to Topology” and also constitute one of the pillars of the new Cluster of Excellence “Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter” (ct.qmat).

Our work combines physics and chemistry and takes place in close co-operation with the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, the Max Planck Institutes for the Physics of Complex Systems and for Chemical Physics of Solids as well as with the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.

Prof.
Matthias
Vojta
Professor of Theoretical Solid-State Physics and Chairman of the ct.qmat Cluster of Excellence
share