OUR UNIts
…innovative

TU Dresden is my Uni because our basic research produces the data storage media of the future. In applied physics, we store information at the atomic-size scale in crystal lattices.

I work as a research assistant at the Institute of Applied Physics, which numbers over 100 employees, making it the largest institute of the Faculty of Physics at TU Dresden. The Chair of Experimental Physics/Photophysics, which I am affiliated to, researches novel crystal systems using nanoscale microscopy methods.

By applying electric fields in what we call ferro-electric crystals, we can store information in these crystals at the atomic-size scale. However, for a better understanding, the electrically written structures in these crystals must be represented optically.

Usually, scanning probe microscopy techniques are employed for this purpose. These, however, provide only 2D information about electrical states at the surface. In order to obtain complete 3D information, we use a technique known as Cherenkov second-harmonic generation microscopy. Here, the sample is scanned completely in a laser microscope, thus creating a model of the electrical states in the crystal.

In the future, with the help of such high-resolution image data, we will be able to develop completely new materials for use as data stores with enormous information densities or for reconfigurable nano-circuits in artificial neural networks.

The Cherenkov second-harmonic generation microscopy is carried out in co-operation with the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) and the Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) of TU Dresden, and is financially supported by the Volkswagen Foundation.

TU Dresden is my Uni because our basic research produces the data storage media of the future. In applied physics, we store information at the atomic-size scale in crystal lattices.

I work as a research assistant at the Institute of Applied Physics, which numbers over 100 employees, making it the largest institute of the Faculty of Physics at TU Dresden. The Chair of Experimental Physics/Photophysics, which I am affiliated to, researches novel crystal systems using nanoscale microscopy methods.

By applying electric fields in what we call ferro-electric crystals, we can store information in these crystals at the atomic-size scale. However, for a better understanding, the electrically written structures in these crystals must be represented optically.

Usually, scanning probe microscopy techniques are employed for this purpose. These, however, provide only 2D information about electrical states at the surface. In order to obtain complete 3D information, we use a technique known as Cherenkov second-harmonic generation microscopy. Here, the sample is scanned completely in a laser microscope, thus creating a model of the electrical states in the crystal.

In the future, with the help of such high-resolution image data, we will be able to develop completely new materials for use as data stores with enormous information densities or for reconfigurable nano-circuits in artificial neural networks.

The Cherenkov second-harmonic generation microscopy is carried out in co-operation with the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) and the Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) of TU Dresden, and is financially supported by the Volkswagen Foundation.

Benjamin
Kirbus
Master’s Student of Physics
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TU Dresden is my Uni because our basic research produces the data storage media of the future. In applied physics, we store information at the atomic-size scale in crystal lattices.

I work as a research assistant at the Institute of Applied Physics, which numbers over 100 employees, making it the largest institute of the Faculty of Physics at TU Dresden. The Chair of Experimental Physics/Photophysics, which I am affiliated to, researches novel crystal systems using nanoscale microscopy methods.

By applying electric fields in what we call ferro-electric crystals, we can store information in these crystals at the atomic-size scale. However, for a better understanding, the electrically written structures in these crystals must be represented optically.

Usually, scanning probe microscopy techniques are employed for this purpose. These, however, provide only 2D information about electrical states at the surface. In order to obtain complete 3D information, we use a technique known as Cherenkov second-harmonic generation microscopy. Here, the sample is scanned completely in a laser microscope, thus creating a model of the electrical states in the crystal.

In the future, with the help of such high-resolution image data, we will be able to develop completely new materials for use as data stores with enormous information densities or for reconfigurable nano-circuits in artificial neural networks.

The Cherenkov second-harmonic generation microscopy is carried out in co-operation with the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) and the Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) of TU Dresden, and is financially supported by the Volkswagen Foundation.

Benjamin
Kirbus
Master’s Student of Physics
share