OUR nano-tUNIngs
…integrated

TU Dresden is my Uni because we develop integrated circuits that mimic human neural networks. TU Dresden is also all about the integration of open-minded, daring, and curious people who enjoy their work and are willing to push themselves to the limit.

I decided to come here from my native country India because TUD is a world-class University with a proven record of academic and scientific excellence. In October 2017, I started the TUD master’s degree course “Nanoelectronic Systems”.

Initiated by the Dresden-based research cluster Cool Silicon, it is all about the technology, design and application of nanoelectronics and thus results from the ongoing miniaturization in the microelectronics industry.

The project I am working on involves Inter-Integrated Circuits, which are systems for the transfer of digital data and, thus, communication protocols. We are using these circuits in the so-called SpiNNaker Chip, which has been developed by scientists at the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the framework of the flagship initiative “Human Brain Project”. This Europe-wide, 10-year project started in 2013 and aims for a better understanding of the human brain in order to research brain diseases as well as the development of so-called neuromorphic computers. From TUD, the Chair of Highly-Parallel VLSI Systems and Neuro-Microelectronics, where my project is based at, plays a major part in this initiative.

TU Dresden is my Uni because we develop integrated circuits that mimic human neural networks. TU Dresden is also all about the integration of open-minded, daring, and curious people who enjoy their work and are willing to push themselves to the limit.

I decided to come here from my native country India because TUD is a world-class University with a proven record of academic and scientific excellence. In October 2017, I started the TUD master’s degree course “Nanoelectronic Systems”.

Initiated by the Dresden-based research cluster Cool Silicon, it is all about the technology, design and application of nanoelectronics and thus results from the ongoing miniaturization in the microelectronics industry.

The project I am working on involves Inter-Integrated Circuits, which are systems for the transfer of digital data and, thus, communication protocols. We are using these circuits in the so-called SpiNNaker Chip, which has been developed by scientists at the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the framework of the flagship initiative “Human Brain Project”. This Europe-wide, 10-year project started in 2013 and aims for a better understanding of the human brain in order to research brain diseases as well as the development of so-called neuromorphic computers. From TUD, the Chair of Highly-Parallel VLSI Systems and Neuro-Microelectronics, where my project is based at, plays a major part in this initiative.

Aman
Kumar
Master’s Student “Nanoelectronic Systems”
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TU Dresden is my Uni because we develop integrated circuits that mimic human neural networks. TU Dresden is also all about the integration of open-minded, daring, and curious people who enjoy their work and are willing to push themselves to the limit.

I decided to come here from my native country India because TUD is a world-class University with a proven record of academic and scientific excellence. In October 2017, I started the TUD master’s degree course “Nanoelectronic Systems”.

Initiated by the Dresden-based research cluster Cool Silicon, it is all about the technology, design and application of nanoelectronics and thus results from the ongoing miniaturization in the microelectronics industry.

The project I am working on involves Inter-Integrated Circuits, which are systems for the transfer of digital data and, thus, communication protocols. We are using these circuits in the so-called SpiNNaker Chip, which has been developed by scientists at the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the framework of the flagship initiative “Human Brain Project”. This Europe-wide, 10-year project started in 2013 and aims for a better understanding of the human brain in order to research brain diseases as well as the development of so-called neuromorphic computers. From TUD, the Chair of Highly-Parallel VLSI Systems and Neuro-Microelectronics, where my project is based at, plays a major part in this initiative.

Aman
Kumar
Master’s Student “Nanoelectronic Systems”
share