OUR jUNIperus
…natural

TU Dresden is my Uni because we are already working together today to make our environment of tomorrow liveable for everyone. Sustainability has already been the principle of forestry science for centuries.

I am scientific director and custodian of the Forest Park Tharandt. Here, we are currently cultivating over 3,200 different winter-hardy trees and shrubs from almost all continents. This makes the Forest Park the most extensive collection of winter-hardy woody plants in Germany, and at the same time one of the oldest in the world.

As a central unit of the Faculty of Environmental Sciences, the Forest Garden serves the students of forestry science, geography, landscape architecture and architecture as an application-oriented teaching facility.

Here, I am holding a juniper plant (Juniperus seravschanica). Juniper grows very slowly: you would not expect it from the size of this plant, but it is already 7 years old.

These and other plants in the Forest Park, most of which originate from the natural habitat in the actual floral regions, are used in research to observe and document their properties under Central European conditions. This, in turn, forms the basis for assessing their suitability for cultivation in forests, but of course also for use in landscaping, as green spaces in streets and cities, or in various horticultural disciplines.

The focus of our collection is on the genera of oaks, mountain ashes and conifers, and, as regards geography, on North America and the Russian Far East.

We currently maintain particularly close partnerships with the Faculty of Forestry of the Primorsky Krai Academy of Agriculture in Ussuriysk (Russia), the Faculty of Landscape Architecture of the Tongji University in Shanghai (China), and the Faculty of Biology of the Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta (Indonesia).

TU Dresden is my Uni because we are already working together today to make our environment of tomorrow liveable for everyone. Sustainability has already been the principle of forestry science for centuries.

I am scientific director and custodian of the Forest Park Tharandt. Here, we are currently cultivating over 3,200 different winter-hardy trees and shrubs from almost all continents. This makes the Forest Park the most extensive collection of winter-hardy woody plants in Germany, and at the same time one of the oldest in the world.

As a central unit of the Faculty of Environmental Sciences, the Forest Garden serves the students of forestry science, geography, landscape architecture and architecture as an application-oriented teaching facility.

Here, I am holding a juniper plant (Juniperus seravschanica). Juniper grows very slowly: you would not expect it from the size of this plant, but it is already 7 years old.

These and other plants in the Forest Park, most of which originate from the natural habitat in the actual floral regions, are used in research to observe and document their properties under Central European conditions. This, in turn, forms the basis for assessing their suitability for cultivation in forests, but of course also for use in landscaping, as green spaces in streets and cities, or in various horticultural disciplines.

The focus of our collection is on the genera of oaks, mountain ashes and conifers, and, as regards geography, on North America and the Russian Far East.

We currently maintain particularly close partnerships with the Faculty of Forestry of the Primorsky Krai Academy of Agriculture in Ussuriysk (Russia), the Faculty of Landscape Architecture of the Tongji University in Shanghai (China), and the Faculty of Biology of the Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta (Indonesia).

Dr.
Ulrich
Pietzarka
Scientific Director and Custodian of the Forest Park Tharandt
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TU Dresden is my Uni because we are already working together today to make our environment of tomorrow liveable for everyone. Sustainability has already been the principle of forestry science for centuries.

I am scientific director and custodian of the Forest Park Tharandt. Here, we are currently cultivating over 3,200 different winter-hardy trees and shrubs from almost all continents. This makes the Forest Park the most extensive collection of winter-hardy woody plants in Germany, and at the same time one of the oldest in the world.

As a central unit of the Faculty of Environmental Sciences, the Forest Garden serves the students of forestry science, geography, landscape architecture and architecture as an application-oriented teaching facility.

Here, I am holding a juniper plant (Juniperus seravschanica). Juniper grows very slowly: you would not expect it from the size of this plant, but it is already 7 years old.

These and other plants in the Forest Park, most of which originate from the natural habitat in the actual floral regions, are used in research to observe and document their properties under Central European conditions. This, in turn, forms the basis for assessing their suitability for cultivation in forests, but of course also for use in landscaping, as green spaces in streets and cities, or in various horticultural disciplines.

The focus of our collection is on the genera of oaks, mountain ashes and conifers, and, as regards geography, on North America and the Russian Far East.

We currently maintain particularly close partnerships with the Faculty of Forestry of the Primorsky Krai Academy of Agriculture in Ussuriysk (Russia), the Faculty of Landscape Architecture of the Tongji University in Shanghai (China), and the Faculty of Biology of the Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta (Indonesia).

Dr.
Ulrich
Pietzarka
Scientific Director and Custodian of the Forest Park Tharandt
share