OUR commUNIcation
…fast-paced

TU Dresden is my Uni because we redefine the collaboration between human beings and machines. At CeTI, we want to research these new possibilities and make them available to everyone, everywhere in the world.

I hold the Deutsche Telekom Chair of Communication Networks at TU Dresden. The focus of my professorship, which employs more than 50 people, is on the further development of communication networks and access systems for the 5th generation of mobile communication, or 5G for short.

At the core of this new wireless mobile standard is the so-called “Internet of Things”. Here, it is all about the question of how machines interact together with human beings and what advantages can arise from this interaction.

The applications that emerge from 5G and the “Internet of Things” are extremely diverse, ranging from driverless cars through interactions in virtual worlds to energy-saving energy networks, or this “magic glove” that I am wearing here. The sensors integrated in the glove record the movements of my hand and can convey them to a robot that can then reproduce my movements exactly. In this way, people would be able to “slip into the role of a robot” in the future and let the machine work for them at any desired location in the world, for example in a laboratory or in industrial production.

Technologies that make it possible to transmit data in real time are a prerequisite for the feasibility of such applications: the Internet must therefore become “tactile”. TUD’s new Cluster of Excellence, the Centre for Tactile Internet with Human-in-the-Loop” (CeTI) is dedicated to this field of research. How can humans and machines work together efficiently? To get to the bottom of this question, not only do we need new communication technologies to support real time, we also need to understand the human body and its ability to respond.

TU Dresden is my Uni because we redefine the collaboration between human beings and machines. At CeTI, we want to research these new possibilities and make them available to everyone, everywhere in the world.

I hold the Deutsche Telekom Chair of Communication Networks at TU Dresden. The focus of my professorship, which employs more than 50 people, is on the further development of communication networks and access systems for the 5th generation of mobile communication, or 5G for short.

At the core of this new wireless mobile standard is the so-called “Internet of Things”. Here, it is all about the question of how machines interact together with human beings and what advantages can arise from this interaction.

The applications that emerge from 5G and the “Internet of Things” are extremely diverse, ranging from driverless cars through interactions in virtual worlds to energy-saving energy networks, or this “magic glove” that I am wearing here. The sensors integrated in the glove record the movements of my hand and can convey them to a robot that can then reproduce my movements exactly. In this way, people would be able to “slip into the role of a robot” in the future and let the machine work for them at any desired location in the world, for example in a laboratory or in industrial production.

Technologies that make it possible to transmit data in real time are a prerequisite for the feasibility of such applications: the Internet must therefore become “tactile”. TUD’s new Cluster of Excellence, the Centre for Tactile Internet with Human-in-the-Loop” (CeTI) is dedicated to this field of research. How can humans and machines work together efficiently? To get to the bottom of this question, not only do we need new communication technologies to support real time, we also need to understand the human body and its ability to respond.

Prof.
Frank
Fitzek
Professor of Communication Networks and Chairman of the CeTI Cluster of Excellence
share
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TU Dresden is my Uni because we redefine the collaboration between human beings and machines. At CeTI, we want to research these new possibilities and make them available to everyone, everywhere in the world.

I hold the Deutsche Telekom Chair of Communication Networks at TU Dresden. The focus of my professorship, which employs more than 50 people, is on the further development of communication networks and access systems for the 5th generation of mobile communication, or 5G for short.

At the core of this new wireless mobile standard is the so-called “Internet of Things”. Here, it is all about the question of how machines interact together with human beings and what advantages can arise from this interaction.

The applications that emerge from 5G and the “Internet of Things” are extremely diverse, ranging from driverless cars through interactions in virtual worlds to energy-saving energy networks, or this “magic glove” that I am wearing here. The sensors integrated in the glove record the movements of my hand and can convey them to a robot that can then reproduce my movements exactly. In this way, people would be able to “slip into the role of a robot” in the future and let the machine work for them at any desired location in the world, for example in a laboratory or in industrial production.

Technologies that make it possible to transmit data in real time are a prerequisite for the feasibility of such applications: the Internet must therefore become “tactile”. TUD’s new Cluster of Excellence, the Centre for Tactile Internet with Human-in-the-Loop” (CeTI) is dedicated to this field of research. How can humans and machines work together efficiently? To get to the bottom of this question, not only do we need new communication technologies to support real time, we also need to understand the human body and its ability to respond.

Prof.
Frank
Fitzek
Professor of Communication Networks and Chairman of the CeTI Cluster of Excellence
share